Becoming #GoodGrammaritans – turning bad grammar into good deeds

 

That thing about every cloud having a silver lining? 

 

Codswallop.

 

Stubbing a toe, for example. Where's the silver lining to that particular, excruciating cloud? Is it forming in that 0.6-second window that exists after you've bollocksed your big toe against the cast-iron bedstead and before your brain's had a chance to register the terrible pain?

 

No, it blummin' well isn't.

 

And what about spilt red wine on carpets? Not only have you lost a glass of good Burgundy, you've doubled down on the wine-wasting misery by sloshing a crisp white Chablis over it to undo the damage to your deep pile. Which, you'll soon realise, is a myth anyway. So you're two glasses of vino down and have a carpet that smells like Oliver Reed's stag do.

 

Every cloud has a silver lining my backside.

 

But, thanks to the supremely charitable, caring and all-round incredible folks here at 4-LW (me and Matt), there is one dark, broiling, Mordor-esque cloud that now carries with it the silverest of silver linings: the cloud of bad grammar.

 

Yes, the entire 4-LW team (me and Matt) have become Good Grammaritans. We're taking a stand against bad grammar by sending out good vibes every time we see grammatical gaffes made by those who should know better. And by good vibes, we mean donations to The National Literacy Trust. And by donations, we mean really, really small donations, because we're poor.

 

So, when Asda includes an erroneous apostrophe on their Father's Day t-shirts we'll be there to pounce, to point, to laugh, to point and laugh, and to then donate £2.42p to the National Literacy Trust.

 

Turning something bad into something good. That's classic 4-LW.

 

Image c/o Huffington Post

Image c/o Huffington Post

 

The National Literacy Trust, in case you didn't know, are an independent charity who help disadvantaged kids read and write. Their great work not only ensures future generations are getting the tools they need to live a creative, fulfilling life, it also means there'll be fewer grammatical balls-ups in the future.

 

Which means Matt and I won't have to continually shell out for spurious semicolons, egregious apostrophes and substandard spelling.

 

Which means that by helping the NLT you're really helping us not be broke. Great!

 

You can donate to them by clicking here

 

Look out for our #GoodGrammaritans shenanigans on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram), where we'll be grammar-shaming those who should know better and raising a few quid for The National Literacy Trust in the process.

 

Which is less a silver lining and more a great shining effulgent guarantee of a better grammatical tomorrow*.

 

 

 

 

*Not a guarantee.